Food and Wine Shopping and Entertainment
March 20, 2018
I was begininng to believe that it is foolish and perhaps pretentious and often boring, as well as damnably expensive, to make a meal of six or eight courses just because the guests who are to eat it have always been used to that many. Let them try eating two or three things, I said, so plentiful and so interesting and so well cooked that they will be satisfied. And if they aren't satisfied, let them stay away from our table and our leisurely comfortable friendship at that table.

M.F.K. Fisher

Cooking Tip of the Month: Water sautéing

Carrots, potatoes, broccoli and other "meaty" vegetables can be water sautéed as a quick and flavorful change to boiling and steaming. Water sautéing first uses steam to soften the vegetable and then direct heat and oil to brown it.
Place a non-stick sauté pan over a medium flame. Add a sliced clove of garlic, some red pepper flakes, a few tablespoons of olive oil, and enough water to submerge the garlic. Let the mixture boil until it totally evaporates, and the garlic and pepper begin to sauté in the oil. A mild garlic and pepper flavor remains in the oil and coating the pan.
Then, add the vegetables, sliced carrots for instance, and enough water to partially submerge them. Bring the pan back to a boil, and cover and simmer for a three to five minutes. The steam will make the carrots tender.
Remove the lid and turn up the heat to let the water evaporate. The tender carrots will begin to sauté in the oil. Sauté until slightly caramelized. The mild garlic and red pepper will enhance the flavor of the beautifully browned and slightly crisp carrots. Be creative by trying other vegetable and seasoning combinations.
Source:   Culinary Cafe
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